October 2013 Archives

Michael Chabon's introduction to The Wes Anderson Collection

This beautiful tome arrived today. The New Yorker summarizes it best:

Were it only for the text of his introductory essays and extended interviews with Wes Anderson, Matt Zoller Seitz’s book “The Wes Anderson Collection,” which discusses all seven of Anderson’s feature films in copious detail, would be an indispensable resource, as well as a delight….

But the text isn’t all there is to it: the book is entirely in the Andersonian spirit—it’s a beautiful object, not a coffee-table book (except in size) but one that’s designed and thought out to its slightest detail, with its amazingly wide and deep offering of visual documentation. (Far be it from me to diminish the images and artifacts by calling them “illustrations.”) Still photographs from the set, frame enlargements, storyboards, influences (from “Peanuts” to Holbein to Welles), references (record covers, school insignias), and memorabilia (newspaper clippings, casting snapshots) are matched with informative and discursive captions that play like stage whispers, and all are brought together with taste, insight, and joyful celebration.

The introduction by Michael Chabon praises Anderson as much as it reflects on aging and growth:

The world is so big, so complicated, so replete with marvels and surprises that it takes years for most people to begin to notice that it is, also, irretrievably broken. We call this period of research “childhood.”

There follows a program of renewed inquiry, often involuntary, into the nature and effects of mortality, entropy, heartbreak, violence, failure, cowardice, duplicity, cruelty, and grief; the researcher learns their histories, and their bitter lessons, by heart. Along the way, he or she discovers that the world has been broken for as long as anyone can remember, and struggles to reconcile this fact with the ache of cosmic nostalgia that arises, from time to time, in the researcher’s heart: an intimation of vanished glory, of lost wholeness, a memory of the world unbroken. We call the moment at which this ache first arises “adolescence.” The feeling haunts people all their lives.

Everyone, sooner or later, gets a thorough schooling in brokenness. The question becomes: What to do with the pieces? Some people hunker down atop the local pile of ruins and make do, Bedouin tending their goats in the shade of shattered giants. Others set about breaking what remains of the world into bits ever smaller and more jagged, kicking through the rubble like kids running through piles of leaves. And some people, passing among the scattered pieces of that great overturned jigsaw puzzle, start to pick up a piece here, a piece there, with a vague yet irresistible notion that perhaps something might be done about putting the thing back together again.

Two difficulties with this latter scheme at once present themselves. First of all, we have only ever glimpsed, as if through half-closed lids, the picture on the lid of the jigsaw puzzle box. Second, no matter how diligent we have been about picking up pieces along the way, we will never have anywhere near enough of them to finish the job. The most we can hope to accomplish with our handful of salvaged bits—the bittersweet harvest of observation and experience—is to build a little world of our own. A scale model of that mysterious original, unbroken, half—remembered. Of course the worlds we build out of our store of fragments can be only approximations, partial and inaccurate. As representations of the vanished whole that haunts us, they must be accounted failures. And yet in that very failure, in their gaps and inaccuracies, they may yet be faithful maps, accurate scale models, of this beautiful and broken world. We call these scale models “works of art.”

“The ache of cosmic nostalgia.” “The bittersweet harvest of observation and experience.”

Goddamn.

Read the whole thing.

Some more graphs of Beijing's Air Pollution

A bunch of folks across the internet have been doing some great stuff with the air quality data coming out of China via official channels and the US Embassy twitter feeds. My advisor asked for some graphs of available data. They are posted below (all were created in R using ggplot2). If time ever permits, I’ll post some interactive visualizations.

Pitchfork's Keep the Things You Forgot: An Elliot Smith Oral History

Elliott Smith died ten years ago yesterday (Oct 21, 2003). I hadn’t listened to his music in quite a while, though played through a number of his tracks last night. They hold up — and pretty promptly sent me back a decade. Pitchfork has created a well-designed, well-written, thorough ‘oral history’ of his music.

What follows is not an oral history of his life, but of his music; specifically, his solo career. The lines between life and music are tangled, of course, in ways that aren’t neatly prizable, and darker stories eventually creep into the frame at the edges. But the arc traced here begins with the emergence of That Voice: the flowering of his talent, the development of the intimate, inscrutable folk-pop he would mine for the rest of his career. That discovery dovetails with the dissolution of his first band, the loud-rocking Heatmiser. In some ways the development of the former triggered the latter. The story told here begins at this hinge point, as Smith begins exploring the possibilities of his fiercely intimate four-track solo recordings that would pull him away from Heatmiser and, eventually, into the national spotlight.

For those who knew him personally, the task of speaking for Elliott Smith wavers between privilege and burden. Many of the 18 people who spoke to me—bandmates, producers, managers, friends—emerged hesitantly, stepping gingerly over their own profound misgivings, issuing grave caveats. They’d been burned before, they warned me. They swore they’d never speak again. The story of their self-imposed silence, and their individual choices to break it or hold it, runs in powerful counterpoint to Smith’s own story. Some of the singer’s closest associates have simply declined to go on record: Having been prodded multiple times, they have understandably snapped shut. Some are speaking now for the first time. The combination of profound ambivalence and fierce conviction in their voices, as they opened themselves up, was chastening.

The Atlantic’s got a nice list of remembrances, some of which are new or new to the internet.

Shake: Hilarious High-Speed Photographs of Dogs Shaking by Carli Davidson

This is hilarious. Learn more at colossal or check out Carli Davidson’s website for photo samples and more about the project.

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The first trailer for Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel was released today. Looks positively Wes Anderson-errific. Can’t wait.

Using RAW to visualize Global Burden of Disease Data

RAW is a really impressive and easy-to-use data visualization tool created by Density Design. I created the following plot in about five minutes from existing GBD data (of DALYs in India for women of all ages).

Air Pollution ? Household air pollution from solid fuels 14,430,417Dietary/Physical ? Dietary risks 14,139,801Dietary risks ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 12,251,100Undernutrition ? Iron deficiency 10,145,794Undernutrition ? Childhood underweight 10,112,321Physiological ? High blood pressure 9,598,107Iron deficiency ? Nutritional deficiencies 9,245,200High blood pressure ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 9,236,250Childhood underweight ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 7,993,580Air Pollution ? Ambient particulate matter pollution 6,963,544Physiological ? High fasting plasma glucose 6,839,755Tobacco ? Tobacco smoking 6,456,925Undernutrition ? Suboptimal breastfeeding 5,430,200Suboptimal breastfeeding ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 5,430,200Household air pollution from solid fuels ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 4,939,660Sexual abuse ? Intimate partner violence 4,907,625Dietary/Physical ? Physical inactivity and low physical activity 4,684,952Household air pollution from solid fuels ? Chronic respiratory diseases 4,629,250Household air pollution from solid fuels ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 4,242,530Ambient particulate matter pollution ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 4,051,780High fasting plasma glucose ? Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 3,758,890Physical inactivity and low physical activity ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 3,212,120Intimate partner violence ? Self-harm and interpersonal violence 3,066,340Alcohol & Drugs ? Alcohol use 3,020,381Tobacco smoking ? Chronic respiratory diseases 2,767,440WatSan ? Unimproved sanitation 2,691,430Unimproved sanitation ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 2,691,430High fasting plasma glucose ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 2,527,440Physiological ? High body-mass index 2,517,676Occupational risks ? Occupational risks 2,341,920Physiological ? High total cholesterol 2,308,860High total cholesterol ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 2,308,860Childhood underweight ? Nutritional deficiencies 2,096,190Tobacco smoking ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 1,914,150Ambient particulate matter pollution ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 1,721,660Intimate partner violence ? Mental and behavioral disorders 1,577,950Other Env ? Lead exposure 1,397,538Sexual abuse ? Childhood sexual abuse 1,374,294Lead exposure ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 1,345,890Tobacco smoking ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 1,282,190Alcohol & Drugs ? Drug use 1,210,892High body-mass index ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 1,197,470Undernutrition ? Vitamin A deficiency 1,185,772Vitamin A deficiency ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 1,178,350Undernutrition ? Zinc deficiency 1,126,100Zinc deficiency ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 1,126,100Dietary risks ? Neoplasms 1,101,710Ambient particulate matter pollution ? Chronic respiratory diseases 1,099,640Occupational risks ? Chronic respiratory diseases 1,008,390Physical inactivity and low physical activity ? Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 990,530Drug use ? Mental and behavioral disorders 986,262Iron deficiency ? Maternal disorders 900,594High body-mass index ? Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 896,822Occupational risks ? Musculoskeletal disorders 775,941Alcohol use ? Mental and behavioral disorders 718,838Childhood sexual abuse ? Mental and behavioral disorders 716,375Dietary risks ? Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 707,042Childhood sexual abuse ? Self-harm and interpersonal violence 657,919Alcohol use ? Cirrhosis of the liver 617,146WatSan ? Unimproved water source 604,815Unimproved water source ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 604,815Alcohol use ? Cardiovascular and circulatory diseases 576,253High fasting plasma glucose ? HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis 553,425Air Pollution ? Ambient ozone pollution 548,650Ambient ozone pollution ? Chronic respiratory diseases 548,650Physical inactivity and low physical activity ? Neoplasms 482,302Household air pollution from solid fuels ? Other non-communicable diseases 443,135Tobacco smoking ? Neoplasms 418,225High blood pressure ? Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 361,857Physiological ? Low bone mineral density 301,652Low bone mineral density ? Unintentional injuries other than transport injuries 301,652High body-mass index ? Musculoskeletal disorders 268,266Occupational risks ? Unintentional injuries other than transport injuries 265,035Intimate partner violence ? Maternal disorders 263,335Alcohol use ? HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis 225,666Occupational risks ? Other non-communicable diseases 205,120Alcohol use ? Unintentional injuries other than transport injuries 199,629Drug use ? Self-harm and interpersonal violence 176,098Household air pollution from solid fuels ? Neoplasms 175,842Alcohol use ? Neoplasms 168,593Alcohol use ? Transport injuries 166,825High body-mass index ? Neoplasms 155,118Alcohol use ? Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 144,849Alcohol use ? Self-harm and interpersonal violence 134,200Ambient particulate matter pollution ? Neoplasms 90,464Dietary risks ? Musculoskeletal disorders 79,949Occupational risks ? Transport injuries 68,973Tobacco smoking ? HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis 53,020Lead exposure ? Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 48,752Other Env ? Residential radon 46,637Residential radon ? Neoplasms 46,637Drug use ? HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis 41,603Alcohol use ? Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 34,055Alcohol use ? Neurological disorders 30,366Childhood underweight ? Neglected tropical diseases and malaria 22,551Tobacco smoking ? Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 21,900Occupational risks ? Neoplasms 18,461Vitamin A deficiency ? Nutritional deficiencies 7,422Drug use ? Cirrhosis of the liver 4,606Alcohol use ? Digestive diseases (except cirrhosis) 3,961Lead exposure ? Mental and behavioral disorders 2,896Drug use ? Other communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disorders 1,687Drug use ? Neoplasms 635Alcohol & Drugs 4,231,273Alcohol & DrugsAlcohol use 3,020,381Alcohol useDrug use 1,210,892Drug useAir Pollution 21,942,611Air PollutionAmbient ozone pollution 548,650Ambient ozone pollutionAmbient particulate matter pollution 6,963,544Ambient particulate matter pollutionHousehold air pollution from solid fuels 14,430,417Household air pollution from solid fuelsSexual abuse 6,281,919Sexual abuseChildhood sexual abuse 1,374,294Childhood sexual abuseIntimate partner violence 4,907,625Intimate partner violenceUndernutrition 28,000,186UndernutritionChildhood underweight 10,112,321Childhood underweightIron deficiency 10,145,794Iron deficiencySuboptimal breastfeeding 5,430,200Suboptimal breastfeedingVitamin A deficiency 1,185,772Vitamin A deficiencyZinc deficiency 1,126,100Zinc deficiencyDietary/Physical 18,824,753Dietary/PhysicalDietary risks 14,139,801Dietary risksPhysical inactivity and low physical activity 4,684,952Physical inactivity and low physical activityPhysiological 21,566,050PhysiologicalHigh blood pressure 9,598,107High blood pressureHigh body-mass index 2,517,676High body-mass indexHigh fasting plasma glucose 6,839,755High fasting plasma glucoseHigh total cholesterol 2,308,860High total cholesterolLow bone mineral density 301,652Low bone mineral densityOther Env 1,444,175Other EnvLead exposure 1,397,538Lead exposureResidential radon 46,637Residential radonOccupational risks 2,341,920Occupational risksOccupational risks 2,341,920Occupational risksTobacco 6,456,925TobaccoTobacco smoking 6,456,925Tobacco smokingWatSan 3,296,245WatSanUnimproved sanitation 2,691,430Unimproved sanitationUnimproved water source 604,815Unimproved water sourceCardiovascular and circulatory diseases 43,560,973Cardiovascular and circulatory diseasesCirrhosis of the liver 621,752Cirrhosis of the liverDiabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases 6,819,848Diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseasesDiarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseases 26,415,704Diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and other common infectious diseasesDigestive diseases (except cirrhosis) 3,961Digestive diseases (except cirrhosis)HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis 873,714HIV/AIDS and tuberculosisMental and behavioral disorders 4,002,321Mental and behavioral disordersNeoplasms 2,657,986NeoplasmsNeurological disorders 30,366Neurological disordersSelf-harm and interpersonal violence 4,034,557Self-harm and interpersonal violenceTransport injuries 235,798Transport injuriesUnintentional injuries other than transport injuries 766,316Unintentional injuries other than transport injuriesChronic respiratory diseases 10,053,370Chronic respiratory diseasesNeglected tropical diseases and malaria 22,551Neglected tropical diseases and malariaNutritional deficiencies 11,348,812Nutritional deficienciesMusculoskeletal disorders 1,124,156Musculoskeletal disordersOther communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disorders 1,687Other communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disordersOther non-communicable diseases 648,255Other non-communicable diseasesMaternal disorders 1,163,929Maternal disorders

The first column contains risk categories as defined by the comparative risk assessment of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease. The second column contains individual risk factors (each of which fits into an aforementioned risk category). The final column shows attributable DALYs by cause. Some color would help differentiate the different risks and causes, but the basic picture is clear if you spend a few minutes with the graph. Women in India, according to the 2010 GBD, predominantly lose healthy life years from CVD, chronic respiratory diseases, nutritional deficiencies, and infectious disease. A fair amount of this is attributable to air pollution.

To make this plot, I opened a CSV, copied its contents, pasted into a text field at RAW, and then used its simple, elegant GUI to generate the code for the plot. The options are a little limited now (would like to add some color, shift label positions around, etc). If I really wanted to make those changes, I could edit the code and do it manually. A really impressive showcase of what can be done in the browser and definitely worth checking out and keeping an eye on.

Shiny Server on WebFaction

Update: WebFaction released today a one-click installed for node.js, obviating Step 2 below. Leaving it in here for posterity.

Shiny “makes it super simple for R users like you to turn analyses into interactive web applications that anyone can use.” It’s a powerful tool with a relatively simple syntax. It’s great for local apps — but I wanted to set up a web-based app that others could access and that wasn’t beholden to Shiny and RStudio’s excellent beta server platform.

I host this site and a few others at WebFaction — an awesome service with little to no downtime, fast servers, and relatively flexible restrictions. Getting Shiny up and running on WebFaction required a little work.

Step 1: SSH into WebFaction. Follow the instructions on their website for your specific server(s).

Step 2: Make a source directory. Download and install node.js.

mkdir src
cd src
wget 'http://nodejs.org/dist/v0.10.20/node-v0.10.20.tar.gz'
tar -xzf node-v0.10.20.tar.gz
cd node-v0.10.20
python2.7 configure --prefix=$HOME
make PYTHON=python2.7
make PYTHON=python2.7 install

export NODE_PATH="$HOME/lib/node_modules:$NODE_PATH"
echo 'export NODE_PATH="$HOME/lib/node_modules:$NODE_PATH"' >> $HOME/.bashrc 

Step 3: Download and install R.

#install R
wget 'http://cran.us.r-project.org/src/base/R-3/R-3.0.2.tar.gz'
tar -xzf R-3.0.2.tar.gz
cd R-3.0.2
./configure --prefix $HOME
make
make install

Step 4: Make a temp/tmp/temporary director.

cd $HOME
mkdir tmp
chmod 777 tmp
TMPDIR=$HOME/tmp
export TMPDIR

Step 5: Download Shiny from source and install using NPM.

git clone https://github.com/rstudio/shiny-server.git
npm install -g shiny-server/

installing from NPM directly did not work — Shiny would not launch. I believe this is because you’re not allowed root access on WebFaction shared accounts.

Step 6: Launch R and install whatever packages you need.

install.packages('ggplot2')
install.packages('data.table')
devtools::install_github("ShinyDash", "trestletech")
devtools::install_github("shiny-incubator", "rstudio")

Step 7: Want plots to work? In your Shiny app’s global.R file, set

options(bitmapType = 'cairo')

Next up: a cron job to keep a Shiny instance running or to restart it if it goes down… and putting Shiny behind some light authentication to prevent pre-release apps from general consumption.

The Best American Infographics 2013

The Best American Infographics 2013 came in yesterday. It’s chock-full of goodness and inspiring visual displays of data. Some are nonsensical, some are dense and shocking. They’re all pretty engaging and the collection appears well-curated. Wired has a number of the selected graphics online.

The book’s introduction was written by David Byrne. I’ll add a link to the essay if it appears online. In the meantime, my favorite bit follows.

The very best of these, in my opinion, engender and facilitate an insight by visual means - allow us to grasp some relationship quickly and easily that otherwise would take many pages and illustrations and tables to convey. Insight seems to happen most often when data sets are crossed in the design of the piece - when we can quickly see the effects on something over time, for example, or view how factors like income, race, geography, or diet might affect other data. When that happens, there’s an instant “Aha!” - we can see how income affects or at least correlates with, for example, folks’ levels of education. Or, less expectedly, we might, for example, see how rainfall seems to have a profound effect on consumption of hard liquor (I made that part up). What we can get in this medium is the instant revelation of a pattern that wasn’t noticeable before.

One would hope that we could educate ourselves to be able to spot the evil infographics that are being used to manipulate us, or that are being used to hide important patterns and information. Ideally, an educated consumer of infographics might develop some sort of infographic bullshit detector that would beep when told how the trickle-down economic effect justifies fracking, for example. It’s not easy, as one can be seduced relatively easily by colors, diagrams and funny writing.

Living on Earth: Bridging Faith and Reason

Arri Eisen, a close friend, mentor, and Professor of Pedagogy at Emory University, was recently featured on Living on Earth along with two of his most unique students — Lodoe Sangpo and Thabkhe Thabkhe, Tibetan Buddhist monks learning and doing science and taking courses. Check out the interview below.

David Byrne: Will Work for Inspiration

David Byrne, in an editorial at Creative Time Reports:

Some folks believe that hardship breeds artistic creativity. I don’t buy it. One can put up with poverty for a while when one is young, but it will inevitably wear a person down. I don’t romanticize the bad old days. I find the drop in crime over the last couple of decades refreshing. Manhattan and Brooklyn, those vibrant playgrounds, are way less scary than they were when I moved here. I have no illusions that there was a connection between that city on its knees and a flourishing of creativity; I don’t believe that crime, danger and poverty make for good art. That’s bullshit. But I also don’t believe that the drop in crime means the city has to be more exclusively for those who have money. Increases in the quality of life should be for all, not just a few.

The city is a body and a mind—a physical structure as well as a repository of ideas and information. Knowledge and creativity are resources. If the physical (and financial) parts are functional, then the flow of ideas, creativity and information are facilitated. The city is a fountain that never stops: it generates its energy from the human interactions that take place in it. Unfortunately, we’re getting to a point where many of New York’s citizens have been excluded from this equation for too long. The physical part of our city—the body—has been improved immeasurably. I’m a huge supporter of the bike lanes and the bike-share program, the new public plazas, the waterfront parks and the functional public transportation system. But the cultural part of the city—the mind—has been usurped by the top 1 percent.

This Charming Charlie

One part Peanuts comic strip, one part Smiths lyrics. One hundred percent hilarious. See more here.

Laboratory and Field Evaluation of the Particle and Temperature Sensor (PATS+) System: A Portable, Robust, and Low-cost Platform for Monitoring Combustion-related Household Air Pollution

Pillarisetti A, Holstius D, Johnson M, Allen T, Canuz E, Charron D, Pennise D, Seto E, Smith KR. Laboratory and Field Evaluation of the Particle and Temperature Sensor (PATS+) System: A Portable, Robust, and Low-cost Platform for Monitoring Combustion-related Household Air Pollution . American Association for Aerosol Research, 32nd Annual Conference. Portland, Oregon: October 2, 2013.

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