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Four Gallup polls related to energy and climate

Gallup conducted its annual Environment poll between March 1-10. They have released four snippets of fascinating data related to global warming, reliance on fossil fuels, and nuclear energy.

A/ More people are attributing warmer and colder weather to climate change than previously

Seventy percent of the subset of U.S. adults experiencing warmer temperatures this winter, and 44% of those experiencing colder than normal temperatures, attribute their atypical weather to human activity.

In 2012, when temperatures nationwide were 3.69 degrees higher on average than normal, 38% of those experiencing warmer than usual weather blamed it on human activity. The percentage blaming warmer weather on human activity rose into the 50s from 2013 to 2017 before rising to 70% this year.

The sample sizes of those experiencing colder than normal weather in 2012 and 2013 were too small to allow reporting of these respondents’ views on the cause. However, in 2014, when the sample size was sufficient, just 29% thought colder-than-normal weather was due to human activity. That rose to 37% in 2015, to 40% in 2016, and has since been above 40%.

B/ The data on climate change indicate greater concern overall among the populace, but dramatic differences across party and ideological lines.

… the public’s concern about global warming and belief that humans are responsible are holding steady at or near the trend high points. While Americans as a whole are concerned about global warming, the partisan differences between Democrats and Republicans are stark. Most Democrats take the issue seriously and are troubled by it. Republicans remain skeptical and largely unconcerned.

First, some graphs on the overall concern.

The numbers from 2019 that I find most striking revolve around a question asking whether or not “global warming will pose a serious threat to your or your way of life in your lifetime.” In 2019, 45% said yes and 55% said no. If you split that up by ideology, the difference is stark: 67% of liberals, 47% of moderates, and 27% of conservatives said yes.

C/ The next two items released by Gallup deal with future energy options. The first set of questions focused on decreasing use of fossil fuels in the next 10 or 20 years. 60% of respondents thought it was likely or very likely that the US could dramatically decrease dependance on fossil fuels, with the vast majority wanting to see increased emphasis on wind and solar power.

D/ Gallup also released asked questions on the use of nuclear power. The data show an almost even split:

Americans are evenly split on the use of nuclear power as a U.S. energy source. Forty-nine percent of U.S. adults either strongly favor (17%) or somewhat favor (32%) the use of nuclear energy to generate electricity, while 49% either strongly oppose (21%) or somewhat oppose (28%) its use.

Roughly equal percentages of Americans say nuclear power plants are safe (47%) as say they are not safe (49%). This is the first time in Gallup’s 10-year trend on this question that a plurality of Americans have considered nuclear power unsafe. Even in the 2011 poll, conducted two weeks after the high-profile Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan, a majority said they viewed nuclear power plants as safe.

More information on the sampling methodology and survey methods can be found at the bottom of each page linked above. Visualizations on this page made by downloading PDFs of data from Gallup, extracting tables, and generating plots using some R packages: readxl, ggplot2, and data.table.