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Posts tagged “temperature”

TRAINSET

trainset Access TRAINSET. TRAINSET is a graphical tool for labeling time series data. Labeling is typically used to record interesting points in time series data. For example, if you had temperature data from a sensor mounted to a stove, you could label points that constitute cooking events. Labels could be used as-is or as a training set for machine learning algorithms. For example, TRAINSET could be used to build a training set for an algorithm that detects cooking events in temperature time series data.

It's getting hot in here: Shifting Distribution of Northern Hemisphere Summer Temperature Anomalies, 1951-2011

From Goddard Space Flight Center:

This bell curve graph shows how the distribution of Northern Hemisphere summer temperature anomalies has shifted toward an increase in hot summers. The seasonal mean temperature for the entire base period of 1951-1980 is plotted at the top of the bell curve. Decreasing in frequency to the right are what are defined as “hot” anomalies (between 1 and 2 standard deviations from the norm), “very hot” anomalies (between 2 and 3 standard deviations) and “extremely hot” anomalies (greater than 3 standard deviations). The anomalies fall off to the left in mirror-image categories of “cold, “very cold” and “extremely cold.” The range between the .43 and -.43 standard deviation marks represent “normal” temperatures.

As the graph moves forward in time, the bell curve shifts to the right, representing an increase in the frequency of the various hot anomalies. It also gets wider and shorter, representing a wider range of temperature extremes. As the graph moves beyond 1980, the temperatures are still compared to the seasonal mean of the 1951-1980 base period, so that as it reaches the 21st century, there is a far greater frequency of temperatures that once fell 3 standard deviations beyond the mean.

There’s another telling animation showing extreme heat events across the Northern Hemisphere. This one, like the above, was created by Goddard using Hansen’s data. It is available here.